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JY-HD10U Frequently Asked Questions
How can 1 CCD provide a real High Definition picture?
Would 3 CCDs be superior to 1 CCD?
How does the picture quality of the JY-HD10U compare with a comparably priced professional 3 CCD hand held NTSC camera?
How well does the camera handle fast moving objects?
Can the JY-HD10U produce 24P just like film?
How can I play back a tape produced on the JY-HD10U? Can I use a DV VCR? Can I use any other type of deck?
What kind of monitoring equipment do I need? Can I use a standard resolution monitor during recording or for playback?
Can I manually control the audio level?
Can I manually control the zoom and focus?
Can I manually control the iris?
What is different between the JY-HD10U and the GR-HD1?
How can I edit the material shot by the JY-HD10U? Can I use any other editing software?
Do I need any special cables to view or record the footage from the JY-HD10U?
How does the HDV format handle dropouts?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


How can 1 CCD provide a real High Definition picture?

The JY-HD10U uses an extremely high density progressive scan CCD (1.18 megapixel). This CCD, together with a unique hybrid complementary primary color filter array, provides an almost 1:1 pixel correlation for the 1280 x 720P high definition mode. Thus true high definition is assured.


Would 3 CCDs be superior to 1 CCD?

For absolute picture quality, yes. But there are practical trade-offs. 3 CCDs would provide superior accuracy of color reproduction, and would provide superior resolution for same density of CCD. However, the 3 CCD camera would be larger, heavier and draw more power which requires a larger battery. The 3 CCD camera would also cost more.


How does the picture quality of the JY-HD10U compare with a comparably priced professional 3 CCD hand held NTSC camera?

It depends upon the camera; they really are different! JVC's 3 CCD hand held is the GY-DV300U, which is the highest performing camera in its class. Compared with the JY-HD10U, the GY-DV-300U has better color reproduction, better highlight handling, better shadow reproduction, and higher sensitivity. The JY-HD10U has higher resolution, especially in the vertical direction. Compared with other 3 CCD hand helds, there is quite a range of performance. The worst ones will have attributes similar to the JY-HD10U (even though they are 3 CCD), but with much lower resolution, and priced higher than the JY-HD10U.


How well does the camera handle fast moving objects?

In its HD mode, the JY-HD10U provides 30 progressively scanned frames per second. For slow moving objects, the motion appears smooth. For faster motion, some judder may be noticed. This gives a feeling similar to film, which captures at 24 frames per second. If motion judder is a problem, the camera can be switched to 480/60P (SD mode), which provides 60 progressively scanned frames per second. While the resolution is less than HD mode, it is still substantially higher than NTSC 480i video.


Can the JY-HD10U produce 24P (progressive frames/sec.) just like film?

In HD mode, the JY-HD10U produces 30 progressive frames per second. While this is not exactly 24P, it gives the visual feeling very similar to the motion of film.


How can I play back a tape produced on the JY-HD10U? Can I use a DV VCR? Can I use any other type of deck?

Of course, tapes can be played back by the camera itself. If the tape was shot in the 720P (HD) or 480P (SD) modes, it cannot be played back on a standard DV VCR. Tapes shot in the 480I (DV) mode are completely compatible and can be played back on any DV VCR. In addition, tapes can be dubbed to a JVC HD DVHS VCR via the firewire connector.


What kind of monitoring equipment do I need? Can I use a standard resolution monitor during recording or for playback?

The JY-HD10U offers tremendous flexibility for monitoring. For best performance and accuracy, choose a monitor which can display 720P as its native resolution. The camera can play back at virtually any rate including 1080I, 720P, 480P or 480I. The 480I signal is available both in component as well as composite and S-video, so you can use a standard NTSC monitor for reviewing tapes in the field.


Can I manually control the audio level?

No. The audio level is always automatic via and AGC circuit.


Can I manually control the zoom and focus?

Yes. Zoom can be controlled either by a variable speed rocker control, or a zoom ring on the lens. Focus is either automatic or manual via a focus ring.


Can I manually control the iris?

Not directly, but you can achieve a similar result. The auto iris can be offset up or down to achieve greater or less exposure. Once you get the exposure you like, the iris can be locked so it will not change regardless of scene changes.


11. What is different between the JY-HD10U (professional model) and the GR-HD1 (consumer model)?

The cameras are mostly similar, but there are a few differences which cater to professional needs. The professional version has 2 XLR (unbalanced) microphone connectors vs. a mini jack. Other differences include a color bar generator, audio level indicator in the viewfinder and a higher resolution viewfinder (180,000 vs. 113,000 pixels). There is some difference in picture quality, especially edge enhancement which has been balanced, shaped and reduced to match professional applications. The professional model carries a 1 year parts & labor warranty.


How can I edit the material shot by the JY-HD10U? Can I use any other editing software?

A basic non linear editing program is included with the camera, and there are other alternatives. Cine Form has announced a plug-in for Adobe Premiere which will be shipping by early August. Because of the tremendous interest generated by this camera, virtually all of the major NLE manufacturers working on solutions to work with the JY-HD10U.


Do I need any special cables to view or record the footage from the JY-HD10U?

No. The JY-HD10U includes a component cable with RCA as well as BNC adapters. Another breakout cable provides composite, S-video and audio. For dubbing the footage to a DVHS VCR or computer, a standard 4 pin firewire cable (not supplied) is required.


How does the HDV format handle dropouts?

The Progressive HDV format (HDV1) is physically equal to the DV format, so the probability of dropouts is the same. But since HDV records frames differently, the error correction code has been changed from DV's. In case of HDV, the concealment data comes from the nearest P or I picture. Tracks are written so that the critical data is spread over a larger portion of the tape. This allows errors to be more efficiently corrected. The end result is that HDV is actually more robust than DV in respect to dropouts.